Gut Health

Researchers continue to explore the interaction of nutrients and the gastrointestinal tract, particularly the microbes that make up the microbiome. While some research was conducted to determine if fructose caused changes to the microbiome that could lead to obesity, no scientific evidence has found a component of the diet, such as fructose, to be responsible for obesity or metabolic disorders. More recently some dietitians have been suggesting low-FODMAP diets for managing irritable bowel syndrome. FODMAP diets are low in Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides and Polyols and include foods that are low in fructose but not fructose-free. To date there is limited data regarding the effectiveness of this diet in reducing symptoms. However, some healthcare providers may consider this dietary approach for some patients. It is important to consider the risk of nutrient deficiencies in this diet and that reintroduction of foods should be planned for these patients.

Research Study Summaries

Gut microbial adaptation to dietary consumption of fructose, artificial sweeteners and sugar alcohols: implications for host-microbe interactions contributing to obesity

Calorie Control Council Comments Payne AN, Chassard C, Lacroix C. Gut microbial adaptation to dietary consumption of fructose, artificial sweeteners and sugar alcohols: implications for host-microbe interactions contributing to obesity. Obes Rev. 2012 Sep. A recent review by Payne et al. (1) proposes the hypothesis that sugar compounds—particularly free fructose—contribute to obesity by conditioning gut […]

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Role of Fructose and Low-Calorie Sweeteners on Gut Microflora is Speculation

An article “Gut Microbial Adaptation to Dietary Consumption of Fructose Artificial Sweeteners and Sugar Alcohols: Implications for host-microbe interactions contributing to obesity,” fails to show that fructose and low-calorie sweeteners contribute to obesity.

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