Gout / Uric Acid

Gout is a painful form of arthritis caused by the buildup of uric acid that can result in uric acid crystals accumulating in joints, often in the big toe. Researchers have studied various risk factors that may increase the incidence of gout development. The majority of this research has concluded that foods high in purines are most strongly linked to the development of gout. Purine-rich foods and beverages include meats, fish, dried beans and peas, and alcohol, among others. Additionally, it is well established that excess body weight and dietary alcohol intake significantly increased risk whereas diets high in fiber can reduce risk. Sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption and gout development has been well studied and researchers have been unable to establish a definitive link between fructose, the main sweetener of SSB, and gout incidence.

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Research Study Summaries

Fructose Intake, Serum Uric Acid, and Cardiometabolic Disorders: A Critical Review

On April 18, Caliceti et al. published a review entitled “Fructose Intake, Serum Uric Acid, and Cardiometabolic Disorders: A Critical Review” in Nutrients. The review focuses on the role of uric acid (UA) in cardio metabolic disorders and the relationship between fructose consumption, blood UA, and health outcomes. The authors first review purine metabolism including […]

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Study Linking Fructose Intake to Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

A study entitled “Serum uric acid concentrations and fructose consumption are independently associated with NASH in children and adolescents,” was recently published in the Journal of Hepatology. The purpose of the study was to identify the factors associated with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in children and adolescents with confirmed cases of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). More […]

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Uric Acid and Transforming Growth Factor in Fructose-induced Production of ROS in Skeletal Muscle

An article was recently published in Nutrition Reviews which aimed to summarize the current literature on the effects of fructose on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and mitochondrial dysfunction in various tissues, particularly skeletal muscle, and identify research gaps for which future endeavors should address. First, reviewers provided an overview of the metabolic effects of […]

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Fructose Intake and Risk of Gout and Hyperuricemia

A recent systematic review and meta-analysis from The BMJ attempts to define a relationship between fructose intake and the development of gout and hyperuricemia. Researchers were only able to identify two prospective cohort studies which met their selection criteria; both of which pertained to fructose intake and gout but did not address incidence of hyperuricemia. […]

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Fructose Intake and Risk of Gout and Hyperuricemia, Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

A recent systematic review and meta-analysis from The BMJ attempts to define a relationship between fructose intake and the development of gout and hyperuricemia. Researchers were only able to identify two prospective cohort studies which met their selection criteria; both of which pertained to fructose intake and gout but did not address incidence of hyperuricemia. […]

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Research Shows No Harm at Typical Intake Levels

Fructose does not increase body weight, blood pressure, uric acid or insulin levels, and may improve glycemic control at normal consumption levels, according to research.

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Calorie Control Council Response to Choi et al

Fructose-rich beverages and risk of gout in women

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Sugar-sweetened beverages, serum uric acid, and blood pressure in adolescents

The conclusion by Nguyen et al that higher sugar-sweetened beverage consumption (as proxy for dietary fructose) may affect cardiovascular risk factors like serum uric acid and blood pressure lacks significance for three reasons.

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Lack of association between dietary fructose and hyperuricemia risk in adults

High serum uric acid concentration (hyperuricemia) has been studied for its relationship with multiple adverse health outcomes, such as metabolic syndrome. Intervention studies have produced inconsistent outcomes for the relationship between fructose intake and serum uric acid concentration.

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Calorie Control Council Response to Choi & Curhan

Soft drinks, fructose consumption, and the risk of gout in men: prospective cohort study

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