Liver Health

Short-Term Isocaloric Intake of a Fructose- but not Glucose-Rich Diet Affects Bacterial Endotoxin Concentrations and Markers of Metabolic Health in Normal Weight Healthy Subjects

Mol Nutr Food Res, 2019; //doi: 10.1002/mnfr.201800868 Nier A, Brandt A, Rajcic D, et al. Download Research Study PDF Objective To determine if an isocaloric exchange of complex carbohydrates with fructose or glucose affects surrogate markers of liver health and vascular endothelial function in healthy normal weight young male and female adults. If so, the […]

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Effect of a Low Free Sugar Diet vs Usual Diet on Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Adolescent Boys: A Randomized Clinical Trial

JAMA. 2019;321(3):256-265. doi:10.1001/jama.2018.20579 — Schwimmer JB, Ugalde-Nicalo P, Welsh JA, et al. Download Research Study PDF Objective To determine the effects of a diet low in free sugars in adolescent boys with NAFLD. Background From 1988 to 2010, the prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) increased among children in the United States.  Pediatric NAFLD […]

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Dietary Sources of Fructose and Its Association with Fatty Liver in Mexican Young Adults

Nutrients 2019, 11, 522; doi:10.3390/nu11030522 — Cantoral A, Contreras-Manzano A, Luna-Villa L, et al. Download Research Study PDF Objective To assess the consumption of dietary fructose according to: 1) classification of hepatic steatosis by two indexes and 2) diagnosis of NAFLD by MRI. Background Previous studies have shown that consumption of fructose through soft drinks […]

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Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Overweight Children: Role of Fructose Intake and Dietary Pattern

Nutrients 2018 Sept 19; 10(9):pii E1329. doi: 10.3390/nu10091329 — Nier A, Brandt A, Conzelmann IB, et al. — Download PDF Objective To determine if the dietary pattern and lifestyle of overweight children without NAFLD differs from overweight children showing early signs of NAFLD. Background Contrary to many other liver diseases, NAFLD is not a disease […]

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Fructose and sugar: A major mediator of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

J Hepatol. 2018 May;68(5):1063-1075. doi: 10.1016/j.jhep.2018.01.019 — Jensen T, Abdelmalek MF, Sullivan S, et al. — Download PDF — Objective To review the experimental and clinical evidence that fructose precipitates fat accumulation in the liver, due to both increased lipogenesis and impaired fat oxidation. Background Historically thought to result from over-nutrition and a sedentary lifestyle, […]

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Habitual Fructose Intake Relates to Insulin Sensitivity and Fatty Liver Index in Recent-Onset Type 2 Diabetes Patients and Individuals without Diabetes

Nutrients 2018, 10(6), 774; //doi.org/10.3390/nu10060774 — Weber KS, Simon MC, Strassburger, et al. — Download PDF — Objective: To test the hypothesis that higher habitual intake of fructose from regular food sources (assessed as total fructose, fructose from fruits, fructose from juices, and fructose from sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB)) are associated with lower hepatic but not […]

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Study Linking Fructose Intake to Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

A study entitled “Serum uric acid concentrations and fructose consumption are independently associated with NASH in children and adolescents,” was recently published in the Journal of Hepatology. The purpose of the study was to identify the factors associated with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in children and adolescents with confirmed cases of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). More […]

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Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is associated with excessive calorie intake rather than a distinctive dietary pattern

A study published in Medicine sought to characterize the dietary patterns of patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and to assess the efficacy of dietary interventions on NAFLD related outcomes. Researchers collected a total of 55 NAFLD patients and 88 controls to complete the study in northern Germany. All participants were subjected to a […]

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Therapeutic Interventions for Fructose-Induced Fatty Liver Disease are Premature

In their recent article, Vos and McClain paint a grim picture of dietary fructose, likening its effect to alcohol-induced hepatic steatosis and liver injury and thereby ‘‘defining targets for therapeutic interventions.’’ The case for such interventions is unsupported, built as it is on inappropriate extrapolation of highly exaggerated diets to the human condition, and decidedly premature for two reasons.

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